9 Steps to Use Vlogging for B2B Marketing

9 Steps to Use Vlogging for B2B Marketing

I was a skeptic about using vlogging for B2B marketing.

The reason is vlogging is notoriously known for YouTube influencers who have almost no association with the B2B space. Yet, everyone is screaming to use video content in your B2B marketing.

Rather than hold back, I jumped right in and created my first vlog.

It wasn’t the best vlog, but I’d taken that first critical step in shooting the first episode.

And that mattered more than anything.

Because now I had momentum even if only a little.

When vlogging for the B2B space, I learned fast what I needed to improve on. There was an entire list, to say the least. To help you skip over all my mistakes, here are the nine steps you need to start B2B vlogging like a pro:

1. Use Your iPhone

You don’t need fancy equipment.

For the first video I made, I used my iPhone and it turned out great. At first glance, I couldn’t tell the difference between my video and the quality the pros use. I figured if I couldn’t tell the difference, then most of my audience wouldn’t mind. It turns out I was right.

Wait until you’ve shot many vlogs before you buy equipment such as lights and a stabilizer. Because if you can’t be consistent, then even the best equipment won’t solve that issue.

2. Provide Context

You’re telling a story.

If you jump from setting to setting without a clear picture of why then the audience will get lost.

For example, in the first scene you’re at your office and say, “Hey, I’m off to visit Jessica to drop off her birthday present.” Then the next scene shows you at her doorstep with the present. Without that sentence referencing what you’re about to do, the audience won’t understand why you’re at someone’s doorstep with a present.

3. Add More B-Roll in Your Clips

Storytelling is about capturing the smaller moments. If you’re vlogging a scene where you’re doing work, then zoom in on the laptop so the viewers can see what project you’re working on. You can even do this if you’re vlogging a scene of you reading a book. Zoom in on the couple of sentences that really struck you.

If you’re attending an event, then capture the road when you’re driving over to the event. Here’s an example below.

Here’s another example from an airport.

In both scenes, you get an idea that there’s a transition happening. This is where B-roll can have a very positive effect in tying the bits and pieces of your story together.

4. More Perspectives

If you’re in selfie mode the entire vlog, then your audience will get bored fast. They want different perspectives. In one of the Casey Neistat’s vlogs, he has many different perspectives.

Places the camera down and looks directly into it:

Shoots a couple while on the go:

Introduces an object and a person while standing in front of a stabilized camera:

Shows the handlebars of a moving bike:

Each perspective has a seamless transition into the next. By using the different viewpoints, he captures more of the viewer’s attention because almost every scene is different, yet crucial to the story.

5. Follow the Soundtrack

Easier said than done. You may be using several different soundtracks for your videos and that’s okay. The idea here is to sync the sound with emotion you’re aiming to portray. This requires you to have a strong music database in the back of your mind or stored and categorized on your laptop.

It doesn’t have to be anything special. Here’s a clip from this Casey Neistat video where the background music is subtle and helps make the revealing more intimate while providing suspense.

The light sound in the background leads up to the moment the package is opened, then it drops.

6. Walk With the Camera

To keep the story feeling like it’s moving forward, ensure to have scenes where you walk with the camera. Gary Vaynerchuk does this more than anyone I know. He opens up this video with a scene of him walking which grabs the viewer’s attention.

Walking with the video provides momentum, but like any good storyline, you need balance. It’s important that’s there’s walking, then a drop in momentum. By pulling the viewers’ emotions in different directions, they become more entrenched in the story.

7. Look Straight into the Camera

I always mess this up.

When you’re filming yourself, there’s a strong tendency to look at the video rather than the camera. If you don’t look at the camera, then the vlog loses a sense of intimacy with the viewer. It’s a similar effect to a conversation in which you’re looking into people’s eyes.

For some vloggers like Casey Neistat, they always wear sunglasses which makes it easier. This way people can’t tell if you’re looking at the screen or the camera. Still, it’s better to not wear sunglasses and show people your eyes to provide that sense of intimacy.

8. Company Content that Sells

When you’re in the B2B space, take advantage of all the things that make you unique. This means recording pieces of company meetings, moments where you celebrate wins, and diving into the backgrounds of the people you work with. Gary Vaynerchuk is the leading example of B2B execution in the vlogging world. Take a look here at how he documents a company meeting in the intro to this video.

In fact, this entire video is about company meetings and has over 500,000 views. If you thought your business life was boring, well Gary proves there’s a large audience hungry for this material.

9. Overall B2B Content that Works

If you’re not at the office, then as an entrepreneur, you’re probably traveling to events, jumping on planes, and speaking at conferences. Here’s a piece from my first vlog where I interview a couple of entrepreneurs from a conference I spoke at.

It’s a short clip, but gets the point across that I’m meeting high-level entrepreneurs.

Start with a Couple of Minutes

The first vlog I shot, I pieced together from four minutes of video. There were only four minutes of video because of how afraid I was to shoot in public. As a result, the final video was only around two minutes.

Even though I felt self-conscious, I did it anyway. Today, I’m much less afraid to shoot because the hardest step is the first. It’s seeing that even with a little bit of effort you can get results. In the B2B space, there are few taking vlogging seriously making it one of the easiest channels to build your brand on.

It’s time you hit record.

How Loom Scaled to 500K Users without Spending a Penny on Marketing

How Loom Scaled to 500K Users without Spending a Penny on Marketing

Loom did what many consider impossible for a B2B company.

They want viral, non-stop.

Resulting in 500K users in a couple of years.

Today, they have over 1.7 million visitors/month to their site.

The last time we’ve seen growth this fast, it happened with Slack.

And with investments from growth marketing experts, Hiten Shah and Brian Balfour, they have the knowledge base to keep it moving forward fast.

In this piece, we explain the story behind Loom per an exclusive interview with co-founder, Shahed Khan. Then we dive into makes Loom one of the most viral B2B products today. Enjoy.

What is Loom?

Loom is a communication tool that helps people get their messages across through instantly shareable videos. With Loom, you can capture your screen, record your front-facing camera, and narrate your video all at once — no switching apps or upload required. Whether it’s training new teammates or replying to a customer inquiry, Loom enhances the way people communicate.

The interface is simple. You click the Chrome extension icon, then the setting pop up. With one more click, you’re ready to record.

Loom was the Brainchild of a Failed User Testing Product

“The co-founder and I [Shahed Khan] knew we wanted to work together, but we didn’t know what the product would be. We were brainstorming different ideas on Skype. We came up with this idea that we threw on the whiteboard which was user testing….spent the first six months building out [the] platform…Companies could install a single line of JavaScript on their page and a test prompt would pop up allowing them to collect qualitative insights.

These users would get a little dialogue box that asks them to install a Chrome extension. This Chrome extension allowed you to record your screen, audio, and camera in a single string and whether the test was 30 seconds long or 30 hours long. The video would get uploaded instantly, then be sent to the test creator.”

The problem?

“They do them periodically and it’s not something you do on a daily or weekly basis. The monetization strategy wasn’t there.”

The Big Pivot

“We were self-funded. We were running out of cash. At that time, we were eating Chipotle Burritos every single day without guacamole. All we could afford in the startup [was] a Hail Mary. We launched this Chrome extension that we had as part of the user testing product under a new brand.

A lot of these clients were starting to record videos of themselves walking through the different user tests that they just watched. They’d record that video summarizing the test, then send them to a product manager.”

Here’s an example:

As you can see by Loom’s current backlink traffic, the idea of product manager using the tool is right on point. Upwork, the freelancing site that thousands of product managers use, is their number one source of referral traffic.

“We thought, ‘oh, this is interesting. I wonder if other people will be using this for a variety of these cases. So let’s generalize it. Let’s call it a screen recording tool and see what people think. We posted it on Product Hunt, then shared it on Facebook. This is July of 2016. From there, it…blew up. We rebranded to Loom in January of 2017.”

Marketing Budget

“It’s all been organic either through the early referral system that we had encouraging users to share to unlock features in the platform.”

If you refer just 3 people you’ll get two premium features plus $15 credit towards more features. Using the same methodology as the famous Dropbox referral campaign, they’ve incentivized users to refer based on features.

By sticking to the product, it ensures the people who get referred are high-quality users.

“We kept it free to get people hooked on the idea of recording videos. So then when we did put up a paywall, they would feel more comfortable investing in terms of dollars. When we first released the referral system, some of our most requested features have been ‘hey, I just recorded a video and I have to rerecord because I stuttered at the last like two seconds of the video. Can I just trim that segment out so I don’t have to rerecord?’ Our community uploads a bunch of features that we end up throwing up and that’s how we dictate what is going to be paid.”

Best Use Case Study Thus Far

“There was just like this giant word of mouth. People were referring the site instead of using the referral link.”

As you can see, the result is a huge increase in organic traffic from people searching Loom. This means the product already has a powerful brand.

“[One of my favorites case studies] This massive company public company has a couple thousand employees. They had 22 employees on Loom who were using it. They have their headquarter office in the US, a couple of remote employees throughout the U.S., and then they have another office overseas.

The reason we didn’t start charging right after that round of financing was that we knew that Loom’s usage within that company amongst thousands of other companies would start to organically grow. Now we’re at over 370 employees from that company.”

Walk Away With This

What Loom did right was simple. They scaled back, then focused on one core feature.

The result? Product/market fit.

Rather than charge, they discovered what their potential customers wanted and would pay for. Now they have 500K users they can monetize at any moment. From pivot to pioneers, the Loom team might just be building the next Slack.

How I Reached Over 25 Million LinkedIn Views in 4 Months

How I Reached Over 25 Million LinkedIn Views in 4 Months

Today, I have 26,000 followers (10K connections).

I used a systematic process for making this happen. This system allows me to create viral LinkedIn statuses every week and engage with thousands of prospects at scale.

In this piece, I’ll be covering the entire system for you.

This way you can get these type of stats in a matter of months:

Are you ready?

Let’s go.

Step 1: Optimize Your Profile

When people look at your profile, they decide whether you’re worth connecting with in several seconds.

These are the questions that go through their head when making this decision:

Do they look like a domain expert?

Do they look like a leader?

Can they help me?

If you can trigger a “yes” to each one, then you can connect with venture capitalists, Fortune 500 founders, and thought leaders – at scale.

It starts with the headshot because people mentally digest pictures before they read.

You don’t need anything over the top. As long as the viewer believes you put in the effort to take a professional headshot, then you’ve increased your add-back percentage.

What’s your add-back percentage?

It’s the percentage of the connection requests you send out that get accepted.

To take it up a couple of notches, ideally, you should have a picture of you smiling. The next step is optimizing your cover photo. There are three photos that will increase your add-back rate:

  1. You with a relevant influencer in your industry
  2. You speaking in front of prospects
  3. You at a local landmark (only works if you’re connecting with people in your city)

Once your viewers finish judging your headshot and cover photo, they’ll read your headline.

The more thought leadership you can portray here, the higher increase you’ll see in your add-back rate. This doesn’t mean writing “Thought Leader” in your headline. You need to list tangible accomplishments or awards, preferably with numbers; otherwise, people won’t believe you.

If you’re lucky, they’ve given a check mark to your headshot, cover photo, and headline.

Now they’re reading your bio.

This is your opportunity to get them to click-through to your landing page. The biggest mistake I see from almost everyone on LinkedIn is lack of specificity. I don’t know what they do and how they can help me. If you can’t state your business proposition in two sentences, then you don’t have a business.

For example, take a look at my bio:

“We drive ROI for growing companies using cutting-edge growth marketing and growth hacking tactics. We’ve worked with companies like TEDx, Mixmax, Voo, LawTrades, Book in a Box, Deputy, and Autopilot.

Services include: B2B growth hacking, PR hacking, chatbots, FB ads, SEM, growth strategy, personal brand management, and marketing automation.

We also manage a community, Badass Marketers & Founders, which has over 15,000 members. You can request access here: http://growth.chat/fbcommunity

Want to work with us? Shoot me an email at [email protected]

For all speaking inquiries, please visit: http://growth.chat/speaking

For more information about me, please visit: http://growth.chat/me

On my free time, I pursue my passion for understanding psychology and neuroscience, especially with how they play into creation, innovation, and social media.”

If the copy works, then why change it?

I have the same copy under my first job title.

It doesn’t end here. You need to optimize every part of your profile.

Make sure you have a logo for each company you’ve worked at. If there’s no logo, viewers will assume the company didn’t exist.

Logos are nice, but recommendations are more tangible. You should have, at least, five. If you don’t, then ask your coworkers and peers for a minute of their time to write something for you.

Don’t be shy. It’s worth the ask.

If you’ve done everything listed, then your profile is optimized.

You’re now ready to expand your network.

Step 2: Auto-Connect to Thousands of Prospects at Scale

With several clicks, you can connect to hundreds of targeted prospects at scale.

Founders of 500+ employee companies in the software space?

Done.

Directors of Innovation of 250+ employee companies in the marketing and advertising space?

Done.

And they’ll accept your connection request because your profile is optimized.

To make this magic happen, you need to buy the Chrome extension, Linked Helper ($15/month). To use the tool for expanding your network, write an invitation message. You’ll see the option in the middle drop-down. Write an intro message that’s NON-SALESY.

Focus on establishing a common bond. For example, in the message below I’m reaching out to founders in Los Angeles. I ensure to include both keywords (e.g. founders, Los Angeles) in my message. This message will go out to everyone you auto-connect with – possibly thousands of individuals.

Next, I plug-in a relevant search query into LinkedIn Sales Navigator. If you don’t have Sales Navigator, then don’t bother to run automation. You’ll get your profile banned.

Now I click “Connect all 2nd contact in Search.” The tool will automatically start connecting with personalized messages to everyone in the search query. Don’t connect with more than 150 people in a 24 hour period; otherwise, you risk the potential of getting banned.

If you send out 150 requests every other day, you can expand your connection base by a couple of thousand targeted prospects every month. Powerful.

Now that you have a strong connection base let’s ramp up engagement.

Step 3: Publish Viral LinkedIn Posts Every Week

You have many prospects in your network.

Do you immediately follow-up with a sales message?

No.

You need to nurture them with value – every day.

Don’t bother with LinkedIn’s Publishing platform – it’s comparable to Facebook Notes. You need to leverage statuses to get seen and heard. An excellent status takes less time to create and will get far more eyeballs than your published post.

Look at this status I created – over 8 million views.

Before you jump in trying to repeat my success, you need to know how to write to drive engagement. It starts with the first two sentences. If those don’t pull your reader’s attention, then you’ve lost them.

Every quality piece begins with a problem, significant change, announcement, or credibility:

Problem:

Significant change:

Announcement:

Credibility:

The last two sentences are almost as important as the first two. If people don’t walk away feeling a strong emotion, then don’t expect them to like, comment, or share your post.

Provide them an “aha” moment:

Here’s another example:

You’re almost a pro. However, you’re missing everything in the middle.

Here you want to tell a story with tangible examples.

Without a story, no one will care.

To tell a gripping story, you need to pull out every adjective from your dictionary, including amazing, super, nice, great, wonderful, and best. Instead, you need to write with TANGIBLE examples.

Here’s the difference:

“Josh is our best salesperson.”

vs.

“Josh closes every prospect on the phone.”

The latter example you can imagine, the first one you can’t.

You know you’re a pro when you can re-enact conversation. A conversation is more tangible than any description.

Here’s an example piece:

If you can writing engaging content like this, then you’ll have no problem nurturing your connections.

Step 4: Use Engagement Posts to Drive Subscribers

To turn your engagement into email subscribers, you can offer a relevant download or ask them for their opinion on a content release. For example, I asked my LinkedIn connections for their opinion on my book cover while providing a link to get notified when the book comes out.

Because LinkedIn decreases engagement for posts with links, I’ll put the link in the first comment. When I hit thirty comments on the piece, I’ll move it to the text area because garnering the initial engagement is the hardest.

Here’s an example piece I used to drive close to two hundred email subscribers:

Here’s another post that has a direct download. I asked people to comment “I’m in” if they wanted it. Then I went ahead and added a direct download after one hundred comments.

Engagement pieces are powerful, but you can’t overdo them. Release only a couple of every month; otherwise, you’ll look hungry for email address rather than someone who wants to build genuine relationships.

Step 5: Use Appreciation Posts to Develop Key Relationships

LinkedIn loves when you appreciate people in your network.

They go crazy over it.

The formula:

  1. Introduce the problem you had before your meeting
  2. Explain the credibility of the person you’re meeting using a tangible example
  3. Dive into the key learning lessons from the conversation using bullet points

Here’s an example post

Here’s another example post:

Publicly acknowledging how people help you is one of the best ways to create valuable relationships. It shows you’re willing to vouch for a friend not only to one person but your entire network.

Step 6: Prep Your Statuses Using Quora

All my best LinkedIn statuses were written months before I began posting them.

How?

They were my answers to questions on Quora. In fact, 8/10 my most viewed statuses were initially written on Quora. I use Quora to validate my content before I post it on LinkedIn. This means that if my content gets high engagement on Quora, then I’ll repost it on LinkedIn.

There’s a slight mismatch. LinkedIn statuses only allow for 1,300 characters, unlike Quora which has no limit. As a result, when answering questions on Quora, it’s best to keep the 1,300 character limit in mind.

This piece was copied almost word for word to LinkedIn:

Quora:

LinkedIn:

I knew the piece would perform well on LinkedIn because it had already given me the validation on Quora.

It’s a nervous feeling guessing at how well your content will do.

It’s a powerful feeling already knowing.

Start writing on Quora.

Step 7: Retarget LinkedIn Connections on Facebook

You’ve learned a few masterful tactics, but there are still more.

This one can drive many leads and engagement for you. All you need to do is export your LinkedIn connections to retarget them on Facebook with engaging content. You can find the option to do so in your LinkedIn Settings – Getting an archive of your data.

Once you export your connections, LinkedIn will send you a list of their emails. Upload them to Facebook as a custom audience, then start running ads. I run video ads because the cost-per-view is less than several cents while still keeping an option for them to click-through to my website with a “Learn more” button.

Here are a couple of example video ads I’ve run to my LinkedIn audience resulting in a 10/10 relevance score (highest score for a Facebook ad performance):

In this page post I used as a Facebook ad, I’m giving value that’s directly related to LinkedIn – perfect for my connections who’ve seen my high engagement.

And again, a 10/10 relevance score.

If you publish engaging statuses, your LinkedIn connections will already knowlike, and trust you. In turn, this will often be your best-performing audience.

Step 8: Interview High-Value Prospects at Scale

If you implemented the content tactics outlined above every day for a month, then people are starting to follow every post you publish. Your network knows of you and people in their network know of you.

It’s time to make sales. We sell in a genuine way – by focusing on relationship building using content marketing. This tactic is more useful if you have high-value prospects. This means your average deal size should, at least, be one thousand dollars.

Because almost every conversation leads into “What do you do?,” our angle is to get high-value prospects on the phone with you before they even receive a sales pitch.

How does this work?

We offer to include them in blog posts, podcasts, case studies, live stream videos, or even online magazines where you can highlight them. We’re playing to their ego – and it works.

Here’s an example message:

This message has over a thirty percent reply rate. Here’s why:

1. Appreciation

“I love the work you’ve done for [X company]”

2. Credibility

“Podcast that gets 2,000 listens an episode”

3. Community first

“As an entrepreneur building a vibrant community of founders”

4. More appreciation

“Knowledgeable speakers and people crushing it in tech such as yourself”

5. Example of a previous episode (not in the picture)

“Here’s an example of a previous interview with [insert credible name]: [link here]”

6. Straightforward call-to-action (not in the picture)

“Do you have fifteen minutes to talk this Wednesday @ 2 P.M. PST?”

With this template, I’ve had the founder of Zapier and Zoom respond to me. It’s that good.

Step 9: Turn Your LinkedIn Connections into a Vibrant Tribe

Once you’ve connected with and nurtured many of your target LinkedIn prospects, you have the leverage to build a tribe. This happens in a Facebook Group, not a Slack community or a LinkedIn Group – those are dead zones.

To get people into your community, there are two ways:

  1. Email
  2. LinkedIn messaging (more painful, but still works)

1. Email

Here’s the email template I’ll send out to all my LinkedIn connections:

“Hey [first name]

As a LinkedIn connection and fellow founder, I wanted to personally invite you to a founder Facebook Group I organize that’s very active, Marketers & Founders.

I happen to run one of the largest marketing communities in Silicon Valley (3000+ members) and the Facebook Group (6000+ members).

The Marketers & Founders Facebook Group is moderated by a few of the best, so it’s invite-only.

Our moderators:

  1. Aj Cartas; 1.2 million social media fans and is an influencer lead @TopBuzz

  2. Taylor Pipes; content strategist @Evernote

  3. Me 🙂 Past head of growth for @22Social, @UpOut, and @GrowthX. 

You can join the Marketers and Founders Facebook Group here:https://www.facebook.com/groups/growthmarketers/

If you want to know more info, feel free to reply.

Cheers,

Josh Fechter”

To email them at scale, you need to have a few warmed up email accounts tied to a domain you don’t use for your website or primary business but sounds relevant to your brand. For example, I used “marketersfounders.com”

Here are the two tools you need to send emails at scale:

Tool #1: Google Apps 


A Google Apps account will enable you to create many email addresses tied to your “temporary” domain. I recommend sticking below 300/day per an email address and starting off at 20/day for the first three weeks.

Tool #2: Mailshake

This tool will enable you to send thousands of emails/day if you have many emails attached. It’s the best tool for sending emails at scale with the shortest learning curve. It took me around twenty minutes to understand the entire tool and another twenty to begin sending emails.

2. LinkedIn Messaging

Andrei posted on LinkedIn whether people were interested in joining his B2B SaaS community. As a result, he received almost over 1,000 responses. That’s 1,000 new members from one post. He only had 2,000 connections when he posted this.

The next step is paying a VA to use your profile to connect with all these people and send them a message with your community link. After emailing and posting on LinkedIn, you should have a couple of thousand members in your community. Well done.

Step 10: Encourage them to Subscribe on Messenger

The first step is to pick a messenger tool.

I use ManyChat because of its feature versatility to capture leads with dedicated landing pages or people commenting on a Facebook post. If you’ve ever used an opt-in tool on a blog, then you’ll have a similar experience when setting up ManyChat. The learning curve is only a couple of minutes.

To get the initial subscriber base, I ran a giveaway encouraging people to jump on. This gave me three-hundred-and-fifty Messenger subscribers.

When I had enough traction for the Facebook Group, I required members to opt-in via Messenger to gain access. As of writing, this approach has led to over five hundred more subscribers in the last month.

After a month of using ManyChat, I leveraged my base to bring in another several thousand subscribers by having the most successful book launch on Product Hunt.

Soon after, I ran another giveaway. If people commented on my Facebook Fan Page post, I’d send them my viral LinkedIn templates. I received over one hundred comments.

Per ManyChat, if someone comments on your post, they immediately become a subscriber.

Play ball where they play ball. It’s easier to get someone to subscribe via Messenger if they’re already on Facebook. The stats prove it: I average a 93% open rate and a 44% click-through rate.

Ready to join me?

Step 11: Follow-Up with Quality Inbound Opportunities

I have a problem.

Too many messages. I get hundreds every day across LinkedIn, Facebook, and email. To sort them out, I hired an assistant. If you’re looking to stay lean, then you can hire a virtual assistant, too.

I’d check out Upwork; it’s one of the best resources to hire virtual assistants.

If you’re publishing content, building your list, and driving engagement, then you’ll get flooded with inbound opportunities. I don’t have the time to look through them all, so I hire people to do that for me.

I pay more to hire people who have experience in my industry. They’re far better at identifying valuable opportunities. Here’s an example of an opportunity I didn’t see for a month because I didn’t have an assistant.

Never again.

Only one of these opportunities can make it all worth it.

Create a Powerful Ecosystem

To excel at one social platform, it often requires the help of others because excellent marketing is an ecosystem. You’re competing for attention. To drive millions of views on LinkedIn, you need to combine the forces of Facebook and Quora.

Wherever your prospects go, they’ll see your engaging content. And by the time they hop on a call with you, they’ll already trust you. Say goodbye to your normal sales cycle by mastering LinkedIn.

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